Occasional Views

I guess the theme of these new posts is: “Blogging About All of the Things That I Didn’t Blog About in 2022 Since I’ve Spent the Whole Year Chasing a Toddler Around.” 

Anyway, back in March, I was fortunate to participate in this conversation with the great Samuel R. Delany, on the occasion of his two new books, Occasional Views, Volumes 1 and 2 (Wesleyan University Press), and to celebrate his 80th birthday which was on April 1, 2022. Thanks to Wesleyan UP publicist Stephanie Prieto who invited me, and Rain Taxi’s Eric Lorberer who organized the livestream, and to Chip, who graciously hosted us in his apartment in Philly. This was one of my most memorable events of the year.

(Yes, I was still rocking the COVID ‘fro which has since been cut down after two years.)   

Nova (and more) by Centipede Press

It feels a little weird to post about a new book that is already out of print. But this volume deserves mention here, and I am grateful that I was able to play a small role in it.   

I was invited by Centipede Press and Chip Delany to write an introduction to Nova for this special hardcover edition of the classic 1968 space opera. The edition features the full text of Nova by Samuel R. Delany (and tarot cards by Russell FitzGerald), an introduction by yours truly, and illustrations by Piotr Jabloński. There are only 300 copies of this edition, each of them numbered and signed by all three of us, and they all sold out pretty quickly.  

However, there are regular copies of Nova readily available in paperback and e-book (via the author’s website).

Back in March I took a trip to Philly to do a virtual event with Chip (more about that in another post) where I signed the last of the Nova signature pages. (Chip took the following two photos.)

This unboxing video by a Centipede Press fan shows just how beautifully crafted this volume is:

I feel less weird posting about this now because there is another Chip Delany volume just out from Centipede. This gorgeous edition of Babel-17 and Empire Star has the two short novels published together, a tribute to the “Ace Double” format. It features an introduction by Lonely Christopher, and artwork by Vikki Zhang.

http://www.centipedepress.com/sf/babel17.html

Here’s another unboxing video, by a different Centipede fan, which shows this amazing volume.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9cGurcMwOE

The Month of Queer Conferencing

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Navigating Normativity UNC-Asheville Biennial Queer Studies Conference  April 2-4

This was my first time in Asheville and it was as picturesque as advertised.  I presented on Samuel Delany’s Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders, and, appropriately enough, the title of my panel was “Navigating Normativity: Southern Style.”  After an informal poll at the beginning of my talk I was a bit surprised to find that none of the people in the room (save for one CUNY Grad Center colleague) had heard of Delany at all! Hopefully I provided a good introduction and created a few new Delany readers.

Overall the conference presenters were much younger than I expected, as my CUNY friend also observed. There were more first year graduate students and even undergraduate papers than I expected.  But that was also an opportunity to get a look at the future of the field.  It was encouraging to see a panel full of brave young women from a state school in SOUTH CAROLINA presenting papers on feminism, sexuality and pop culture. They reminded me of myself as an undergraduate when I got my first exposure to professional academic life by presenting at African-American history conferences.

LGBTQ Scholars of Color Conference April 9-10

Next up was the first LGBTQ Scholars of Color Conference organized by CLAGS and hosted at John Jay College.  The main thing I noticed about this conference is that it was overwhelmingly dominated by social sciences and public health.  That’s a good thing.  CLAGS was founded by historian Martin Duberman, and housed at the CUNY Graduate Center, and has been well-represented with queer theorists in literary and culture studies.  During my time at CLAGS I worked under the leadership of a political scientist who worked to add more social science programming. There was much talk at this conference about navigating the sometimes treacherous world of funding and foundations. This is important stuff because I know this kind of quantitative work influences public policy in a way that the humanities, as important as they are, cannot.  There’s a Storify of the #LGBTSOC tweets from the conference here: LINK

Queer Speculations: University of Maryland DC Queer Studies Conference April 17

What was lacking in the humanities at the CLAGS conference I more than made up for at University of Maryland DC Queer Studies Conference.  I presented at this conference in 2012 which was a 70th birthday celebration of Samuel R. Delany and his magnificent writing.  After a day of stimulating talks at this year’s conference I was glad that I decided to return.  I presented again on Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders, which Delany had just published before the 2012 conference, and from which he gave a reading that evening.   This was another conference with a lot of digital engagement and Alexis Lothian put together this Storify of #DCQS15 tweets which gives a better overview of the talks than I can give here.

I’ve wanted to work on Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders to build out from my 2013 review of the novel in the GC Advocate.  There’s so much that I didn’t get to in that review (the book is 804 pages long) and several things that I wanted to correct.  I also wanted to write about the digital reception of the novel in online magazines and blog reviews, including responses from Delany himself.  It’s a longer range project that is probably more of a tangent from my main research than I should be taking on right now, but it’s something I’ve been bugging myself to follow up on and get finished.  However, it IS related to the book since there are similarities to Delany’s academic novel The Mad Man, about which I’m writing a chapter.

And so, the month of queer conferencing is done, and I’m moving on to the next phase of research, which is more directly related to the book.  At the Northeast Modern Language Association conference in Toronto I’ll be presenting on Percival Everett’s academic fiction, and participating in a “Creative Criticism” session where I’ll be presenting an autobiographical section of the book, talking about my own “blackademic life” in relation to these works of black academic fiction that I’m writing about.

Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders

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This is the abstract is for a presentation that I will be giving at the upcoming “Navigating Normativity” Queer Studies Conference at the University of North Carolina-Asheville.  I’m posting this version even though I’ve modified the talk a bit since this abstract was submitted.  This is a work in progress that I will also be presenting at another conference soon, so I’ll be posting more about it later.

I’m kicking myself for having added yet another project into the middle of a busy and quite stressful month, but I have absolutely no arguments with reading, thinking through, and talking about this fascinating novel again.

“The Splendor and the Misery: Reading the Body in Samuel Delany’s Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders.”   

The Splendor and Misery of Bodies, of Cities, was the proposed title of a sequel to Samuel R. Delany’s popular 1984 science fiction novel Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand, a sequel which thus far has never materialized. (The unpublished, perhaps non-existent, book is legendary among devoted Delany fans.)  Inspired by the title of that mythic text, I’d like to explore “the splendor and misery of bodies” in Samuel R. Delany’s writing, particularly in his 804 page pornographic novel Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders, published in 2012. Like other Delany novels, Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders is full of coarse talk about the body. Delany’s writings are often filled with anecdotes about his own sexual experiences with a variety of people whose bodies fall outside of heterosexual norms, and outside of certain normative gay beauty ideals (of youth, thinness, whiteness, symmetry, ability).  The characters represented in his fiction span a broad range of races, nationalities, ages, sizes, genders and abilities. Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders is full of provocative depictions of race and sexuality, and the characters in the novel often talk about and pursue their desires for racial difference, and use racial epithets as a part of sexual play. One way in which this novel diverges from his prior body of work is that it is not set in the city, but in the rural American South, among a small community in Georgia comprised of black gay men and their admirers known as The Dump, a community founded and organized by a black gay millionaire named Robert Kyle III.  In this presentation I will explore the way that Delany writes about the philosophy of embodiment and the utopian/anti-utopian/dystopian/heterotopian ways of managing and regulating bodies that are depicted and interrogated in his work. Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders is particularly inventive in Delany’s imagining of a community with formal institutions and services geared toward queer people with active sexual lives, and which provide employment and housing for blue collar gay workers.